kungfu-mulutan:

Why we are poor: A purpose for the middle classHINDSIGHT By F Sionil Jose The election results have cascaded in, and we can see that there will be no exhilarating changes in the power structure that moves this country. As usual, many Filipinos with shallow intellects have voted to power pygmies with the barest qualifications. Hopefully though, a few capable leaders who can keep this nation from going over the brink are also coming in.Elections cost billions that otherwise should have gone into the massive infrastructure projects that we need. We may just as well not hold them considering the results. But we must if only to bring the ruler and the ruled face to face even though briefly during the campaign season. And for so many of our poor, elections mean a little income from vote buyers, seeing movie and TV stars up close, and reveling in the fiesta atmosphere which relieves the drudgery of penurious living.All of us are aware of our poverty basically induced by a dysfunctional political system. We have asked why and we have found the answers. This widespread poverty will not be changed, unless our leaders, particularly the President, are ready to betray their clan or class. Now, can we change it? Ballots are ineffective. Bullets, then?But as Marx himself said, a revolution need not be violent. Violence is a last option for there are other peaceful ways, maybe slow, but effective. For instance, in a thoughtful commencement address in Diliman recently, Senator Edgardo J. Angara postulated that a strong middle class would save this country. He may well be right.Let us now examine his thesis.First, what is the middle class? Who are its identifiable constituents?Senator Angara defines the middle class in economic terms:An annual income of at least P282,000.A college graduate family head.Maybe, the owner of a house and lot.To these I’ll add:Anyone who has a car.The origins of classClass — or the economic status of individuals — is evident in all societies, some very well stratified by a rigid caste system determined by birth. It is true, as Senator Angara states: people are not born equal, although libertarians through the ages have insisted that we are.Indeed, the existence of class, of social hierarchy, is as old as man himself. It prevails in the jungle where strength determines hierarchy; among men, it has also been savagely the same, whereby rulers vested with power through personal combat, or through lineal heritage as in the case of royalty ravage their subjects.Except in our Muslim region whose Sultans and Datus have ruled, Filipino society does not have royalty, kings and emperors who built class structures based on birth and lineage. Spanish colonialism destroyed whatever native authority was vested in our indigenous leaders. Power was posited in the religious orders and in the appointees of the Spanish crown. Such powers were complemented by land, encomiendas and haciendas grabbed from the natives turned serfs.This sorry background explains why in the past and even now, the most powerful Filipinos are landlords; and as the old saying goes, the higher the status, the whiter it becomes — Spanish white, not American because the Americans didn’t stay long enough.The class color has changed a lot in recent years; as the latest tallies show, most of the richest Filipinos now are ethnic Chinese engaged mostly in consumerist non-productive enterprises.The wealthy mestizo families that dominated Philippine politics did not last very long. At the most, they held power for three generation, then they faded, and rejoined the middle class.If we examine the roster of our leaders today, particularly the politicians, there is hardly any from the oligarchy except President P-Noy himself. Even those who rose from family dynasties are almost all of the middle class.Our presidents, for instance, with the exception of Cory Aquino and her son, had middle or even lower class origins. It is not that they forgot their class backgrounds but, once ensconced in Malacañang, they joined the power structure, the oligarchy, and for all their avowed purpose of serving the people, they end up pandering to the interests of the oligarchy instead. This is the iron reality of power as it operates in this country and perhaps in all countries colonized by their own elites.And what about the very rich, the elite, the dispensers of patronage? In a sense, it is they who are free, free from the bruising scrounging for food, free from the onslaught of storms, cocooned as they are in their mansions. Like the plutocrats in a medieval age whose palaces were also fortresses, they live in gated enclaves with high walls. If they venture out of their gilded “villages,” they are surrounded by bodyguards. In fact, private armies and the state institutions they have subverted protect them.But try as they may, they can’t avoid the masa, the restive hoi-poloi that surround them. Right in their homes, their maids, gardeners, drivers — they all come from the proletariat. Can these domestics really be trusted?And if the whirlwind comes, at its first slight gale, they flee to where they have stashed their loot — in Europe, in America (perhaps China?) leaving behind the “drawers of water and hewers of wood” who made them rich.In this society, these politicians and their extended generational kin provide patronage to their clients. They are extensions of the landlord-tenant relationship where the tenant is dependent on the landlord. Urbanization, education, economic development, and genuine democratic institutions sunder this relationship and end the dependency on the politician.The real menaceThe elevation of the tenant, villager, former fisherman to the middle class — this, in principle, creates independent attitudes. But now this middle class will be subservient to an economic system more complex than the tenant-landlord relationship, a system led and controlled by socio-economic forces more powerful than the landlord or a family dynasty. This is the real ogre — a colonial government manipulated by the very rich, the oligarchy.By itself, the middle class, the bourgeoisie cannot survive. In the long run, to prevail, it must seek alliance with the lower class, the proletariat — they who have the numbers, the critical mass that rebels. For it is written thus — the ultimate modernizer is the revolutionary. Truly meaningful change cannot be achieved by denying this equation.Marxism, to which many intellectuals all over the world have succumbed, is a very important tool for analyzing poverty, the economic classes. Marxist solutions promote revolutionary violence. It is not the only instrument — in fact, Marx himself admitted that revolutionary change is possible without violence.We have seen this effulgent event in our lifetime, EDSA I in 1986 — that was a non-violent revolution wherein only a handful were killed. Unfortunately, that revolution was demeaned by Cory Aquino when she restored the oligarchy.Elections can be revolutionary, too, and we have had a long practice with it since the first days of the American Occupation when we elected the first Philippine Congress. But the beneficent changes that we want haven’t come for the process was always manipulated by the very rich with the assistance of an ignorant electorate.We hope it may yet come not because the middle class shall have prevailed but because the poor — the masa; with the help of this middle class — shall have recognized that with their numbers, they are the critical mass. With its intelligence, it will create the ideological base of the political discourse. The creation of such consciousness is the primary function of the middle class.During the American Occupation, and even during the Spanish colonial period, there was ideology — our aspiration for independence, but now that we are free, that ideology no longer exists. We now gather around personalities, regional and ethnic biases, kinships as developed by strong family ties. And of course, old-style patronage — what we can get from our leaders who run government. These are the realities behind the system.Why ideology mattersAs I have said again and yet again, poverty and the injustices it breeds is not an economic or social issue. It is moral!We must now infuse our politics with social activism, compassion for our fellowmen, patriotism, and ethics. These are not motherhood objectives. They are specific, compulsive needs if functioning institutions of governance are to be built, if we want justice.We should examine our faith. We could organize on the basis of belief, in the possibility of peace and prosperity in the near future. Such kind of belief argues for sects like the Iglesia Ni Kristo, El Shaddai. Additional nationalist intent, explains sects like the Colorums, the Sakdals in the past.As for the Catholic Church — we take it for granted as the giant archaic and politically sclerotic institution that it is. There is no Catholic vote — this is an obvious result of its powerlessness — this in spite of its tremendous wealth, its elitist educational institutions. To be useful, relevant, those pampered prelates must leave their palaces, go to the masa and bring Jesus to them.It must always be remembered, however, that Filipino society — for all its strictures — is graciously open; golden ghettos like Forbes Park accept any one with money — buckets and buckets of it. And class is never a political determinant, for which reason a workers’ party or even a Socialist or Communist party cannot lure adherents, the way a religious narcotic does.So we must never romanticize the lower class and attribute to it nonexistent virtues and strengths other than the hard fact that it has the numbers, that it comprises the majority of this country, inert but malleable because it’s not ideologically politicized.Our salvation will come from its ranks — not the mindless lumpen, the religious charlatans and their silly converts but those among them who are enlightened, who possess a superior ideology and are truly faithful to their class, their lowly origins even when they shall have joined the middle class.Will P-Noy betray his class?We have had in the past men of such noble stature — Andres Bonifacio, Apolinario Mabini — and it is also from their inspiration that our peasant rebellions sprang, the Colorums in 1931, the Sakdals in 1935, the Huks in 1941 all the way to 1953, and on to the rebels who fought Marcos. And though they are on the opposite side, the thousands of peasants who comprise our Armed Forces, they are just as committed, too, to the defense of this country.It has to be someone, not necessarily from the peasantry, but a leader who sincerely identifies with them, who will redeem us. P-Noy, perhaps, if he betrays his class? Senator Angara is correct; the middle class could lead us but only if it staunchly resists the temptation to join the upper class.Otherwise, alas!SOURCE: http://www.philstar.com/sunday-life/2013/05/19/943580/why-we-are-poor-purpose-middle-class

kungfu-mulutan:

Why we are poor: A purpose for the middle class
HINDSIGHT By F Sionil Jose 

The election results have cascaded in, and we can see that there will be no exhilarating changes in the power structure that moves this country. As usual, many Filipinos with shallow intellects have voted to power pygmies with the barest qualifications. Hopefully though, a few capable leaders who can keep this nation from going over the brink are also coming in.

Elections cost billions that otherwise should have gone into the massive infrastructure projects that we need. We may just as well not hold them considering the results. But we must if only to bring the ruler and the ruled face to face even though briefly during the campaign season. And for so many of our poor, elections mean a little income from vote buyers, seeing movie and TV stars up close, and reveling in the fiesta atmosphere which relieves the drudgery of penurious living.

All of us are aware of our poverty basically induced by a dysfunctional political system. We have asked why and we have found the answers. This widespread poverty will not be changed, unless our leaders, particularly the President, are ready to betray their clan or class. Now, can we change it? Ballots are ineffective. Bullets, then?

But as Marx himself said, a revolution need not be violent. Violence is a last option for there are other peaceful ways, maybe slow, but effective. For instance, in a thoughtful commencement address in Diliman recently, Senator Edgardo J. Angara postulated that a strong middle class would save this country. He may well be right.

Let us now examine his thesis.

First, what is the middle class? Who are its identifiable constituents?

Senator Angara defines the middle class in economic terms:

An annual income of at least P282,000.

A college graduate family head.

Maybe, the owner of a house and lot.

To these I’ll add:

Anyone who has a car.

The origins of class

Class — or the economic status of individuals — is evident in all societies, some very well stratified by a rigid caste system determined by birth. It is true, as Senator Angara states: people are not born equal, although libertarians through the ages have insisted that we are.

Indeed, the existence of class, of social hierarchy, is as old as man himself. It prevails in the jungle where strength determines hierarchy; among men, it has also been savagely the same, whereby rulers vested with power through personal combat, or through lineal heritage as in the case of royalty ravage their subjects.

Except in our Muslim region whose Sultans and Datus have ruled, Filipino society does not have royalty, kings and emperors who built class structures based on birth and lineage. Spanish colonialism destroyed whatever native authority was vested in our indigenous leaders. Power was posited in the religious orders and in the appointees of the Spanish crown. Such powers were complemented by land, encomiendas and haciendas grabbed from the natives turned serfs.

This sorry background explains why in the past and even now, the most powerful Filipinos are landlords; and as the old saying goes, the higher the status, the whiter it becomes — Spanish white, not American because the Americans didn’t stay long enough.

The class color has changed a lot in recent years; as the latest tallies show, most of the richest Filipinos now are ethnic Chinese engaged mostly in consumerist non-productive enterprises.

The wealthy mestizo families that dominated Philippine politics did not last very long. At the most, they held power for three generation, then they faded, and rejoined the middle class.

If we examine the roster of our leaders today, particularly the politicians, there is hardly any from the oligarchy except President P-Noy himself. Even those who rose from family dynasties are almost all of the middle class.

Our presidents, for instance, with the exception of Cory Aquino and her son, had middle or even lower class origins. It is not that they forgot their class backgrounds but, once ensconced in Malacañang, they joined the power structure, the oligarchy, and for all their avowed purpose of serving the people, they end up pandering to the interests of the oligarchy instead. This is the iron reality of power as it operates in this country and perhaps in all countries colonized by their own elites.

And what about the very rich, the elite, the dispensers of patronage? In a sense, it is they who are free, free from the bruising scrounging for food, free from the onslaught of storms, cocooned as they are in their mansions. Like the plutocrats in a medieval age whose palaces were also fortresses, they live in gated enclaves with high walls. If they venture out of their gilded “villages,” they are surrounded by bodyguards. In fact, private armies and the state institutions they have subverted protect them.

But try as they may, they can’t avoid the masa, the restive hoi-poloi that surround them. Right in their homes, their maids, gardeners, drivers — they all come from the proletariat. Can these domestics really be trusted?

And if the whirlwind comes, at its first slight gale, they flee to where they have stashed their loot — in Europe, in America (perhaps China?) leaving behind the “drawers of water and hewers of wood” who made them rich.

In this society, these politicians and their extended generational kin provide patronage to their clients. They are extensions of the landlord-tenant relationship where the tenant is dependent on the landlord. Urbanization, education, economic development, and genuine democratic institutions sunder this relationship and end the dependency on the politician.

The real menace

The elevation of the tenant, villager, former fisherman to the middle class — this, in principle, creates independent attitudes. But now this middle class will be subservient to an economic system more complex than the tenant-landlord relationship, a system led and controlled by socio-economic forces more powerful than the landlord or a family dynasty. This is the real ogre — a colonial government manipulated by the very rich, the oligarchy.

By itself, the middle class, the bourgeoisie cannot survive. In the long run, to prevail, it must seek alliance with the lower class, the proletariat — they who have the numbers, the critical mass that rebels. For it is written thus — the ultimate modernizer is the revolutionary. Truly meaningful change cannot be achieved by denying this equation.

Marxism, to which many intellectuals all over the world have succumbed, is a very important tool for analyzing poverty, the economic classes. Marxist solutions promote revolutionary violence. It is not the only instrument — in fact, Marx himself admitted that revolutionary change is possible without violence.

We have seen this effulgent event in our lifetime, EDSA I in 1986 — that was a non-violent revolution wherein only a handful were killed. Unfortunately, that revolution was demeaned by Cory Aquino when she restored the oligarchy.

Elections can be revolutionary, too, and we have had a long practice with it since the first days of the American Occupation when we elected the first Philippine Congress. But the beneficent changes that we want haven’t come for the process was always manipulated by the very rich with the assistance of an ignorant electorate.

We hope it may yet come not because the middle class shall have prevailed but because the poor — the masa; with the help of this middle class — shall have recognized that with their numbers, they are the critical mass. With its intelligence, it will create the ideological base of the political discourse. The creation of such consciousness is the primary function of the middle class.

During the American Occupation, and even during the Spanish colonial period, there was ideology — our aspiration for independence, but now that we are free, that ideology no longer exists. We now gather around personalities, regional and ethnic biases, kinships as developed by strong family ties. And of course, old-style patronage — what we can get from our leaders who run government. These are the realities behind the system.

Why ideology matters

As I have said again and yet again, poverty and the injustices it breeds is not an economic or social issue. It is moral!

We must now infuse our politics with social activism, compassion for our fellowmen, patriotism, and ethics. These are not motherhood objectives. They are specific, compulsive needs if functioning institutions of governance are to be built, if we want justice.

We should examine our faith. We could organize on the basis of belief, in the possibility of peace and prosperity in the near future. Such kind of belief argues for sects like the Iglesia Ni Kristo, El Shaddai. Additional nationalist intent, explains sects like the Colorums, the Sakdals in the past.

As for the Catholic Church — we take it for granted as the giant archaic and politically sclerotic institution that it is. There is no Catholic vote — this is an obvious result of its powerlessness — this in spite of its tremendous wealth, its elitist educational institutions. To be useful, relevant, those pampered prelates must leave their palaces, go to the masa and bring Jesus to them.

It must always be remembered, however, that Filipino society — for all its strictures — is graciously open; golden ghettos like Forbes Park accept any one with money — buckets and buckets of it. And class is never a political determinant, for which reason a workers’ party or even a Socialist or Communist party cannot lure adherents, the way a religious narcotic does.

So we must never romanticize the lower class and attribute to it nonexistent virtues and strengths other than the hard fact that it has the numbers, that it comprises the majority of this country, inert but malleable because it’s not ideologically politicized.

Our salvation will come from its ranks — not the mindless lumpen, the religious charlatans and their silly converts but those among them who are enlightened, who possess a superior ideology and are truly faithful to their class, their lowly origins even when they shall have joined the middle class.

Will P-Noy betray his class?

We have had in the past men of such noble stature — Andres Bonifacio, Apolinario Mabini — and it is also from their inspiration that our peasant rebellions sprang, the Colorums in 1931, the Sakdals in 1935, the Huks in 1941 all the way to 1953, and on to the rebels who fought Marcos. And though they are on the opposite side, the thousands of peasants who comprise our Armed Forces, they are just as committed, too, to the defense of this country.

It has to be someone, not necessarily from the peasantry, but a leader who sincerely identifies with them, who will redeem us. P-Noy, perhaps, if he betrays his class? Senator Angara is correct; the middle class could lead us but only if it staunchly resists the temptation to join the upper class.

Otherwise, alas!

SOURCE: http://www.philstar.com/sunday-life/2013/05/19/943580/why-we-are-poor-purpose-middle-class

kungfu-mulutan:

‘Yabang’: Our curse and undoingHINDSIGHT By F Sionil Jose Yabang — boasting or showing off — is almost second nature to us. In any conversation, the Filipino suddenly pauses, declares, “Modesty aside,” then relates his journey to the top, his awards.Here now is a caveat to all true believers of whatever institution, ideology and faith. Be not excessively proud of your mansions, your hoard of gold and mega power. Remember always that pride is followed by the fall (Book of Proverbs, 16:18).Of course, we are all egoists. Egoism is so much a part of our humanity.The ancient Greeks had a word for it: hubris. Writers particularly are not immune to it — in fact, with it, they flourish because from their very lives, they extract memory and give it precious form as poetry or prose.It is yabang that makes Filipino males manicure their fingernails, splurge on elegant wardrobes and fancy cars and watches, the same way that Imelda and women with royal pretensions stretch their aging skins and festoon themselves with expensive baubles, including thousands of shoes.It is also yabang when Corazon Aquino declared at the beginning of her presidency in 1986 that she wouldn’t welcome unsolicited advice.Yabang again when her son, the president, said he would ignore his critics.Listen, our historians who do not probe deeply into the character of those who shaped our history should cerebrate the way Nick Joaquin did with his A Question of Heroes. Not that Nick was absolutely correct but by raking into the egos of our heroes, he initiated an insightful way of how to interpret our past.The revolution of 1896 was subverted by the pompous egos, the rivalry of its leaders, particularly Aguinaldo. Divided and disaffected, they were easily cozened into impotence by Spanish bribery in the Pact of Biak-na-Bato.The Huk uprising in 1949-1953 was defeated not so much by Ramon Magsaysay and an invigorated Army; it was destroyed by the quarrels among its leaders, conflicts inflamed by conceit more than differences in tactics and ideology.And again, the defeat of the New People’s Army was made inevitable by the vaulting egos of its leaders and most of all, by the tremendous but crippling self-esteem of its founder, Jose Maria Sison.So it is with our political parties; they splinter soon enough into factions or new parties. This divisiveness argues perhaps for a parliamentary system. It also illustrates clearly what prevents our people from uniting.Professional societies are sooner or later fractured by the ego of their leaders. Everyone wants to be president, chairman, CEO; no one wants to be a mere follower. Now we are praying for a messiah to descend from upstairs and deliver us from this despicable chaos. But everyone wants to be that messiah.We all know of General Angelo Reyes’ suicide a few years back. That was egoism, too, albeit with the nobility of the brave and conscientious. He had declared that he did not start the corruption in the Armed Forces but that he couldn’t stop it. How could he when the highest official of the land was corrupt?“Men,” he told me, “have specific roles in life.” Knowing he couldn’t fulfill it, the end he chose for himself was the most honorable. How many of our leaders can act like he did?So then, we must know our own roles. We should also know the roles that others play, and the rules such roles follow. In this manner, social harmony is maintained. It is when we overstep our roles, or act without knowing them, that social anarchy ensues.The Japanese adhere solemnly to their roles. I was invited to a seminar in the Eighties by the Japan Foreign Office (Gaimusho). It was a small seminar with only about a dozen of us from Asia. At its conclusion we were invited to visit Kyoto to see a portion of the Imperial Palace that was closed to the public but opened only for us. About a dozen officials from the Foreign Office went with us. When we arrived in Kyoto, the guard was shown the list of those who could enter the premises. He allowed only us participants — the Gaimusho VIPs and former ambassadors meekly followed the guard’s orders; they did not pull rank or intimidate him.Now here comes the Mayor of Makati and that imbroglio with the Dasmariñas Village security guards. He should have understood their role as well as his. As mayor, was there an emergency or something truly urgent that required him to undermine the role of the guards? And so today, although the 2016 elections are still so far away, the mayor’s father, Vice President Jejomar Binay, is already the object of negative speculation: Will he be like his son? Will the Binays who are already in seats of power be mayabang, too? Abangan!All dictators, the rich and famous, to the lowest security guard who holds a gun, easily forget that power is transitory. Death, the great leveler, tells us we cannot take anything with us — not the proud mansions and giant coliseums we build, least of all a single medal. How was it in ancient Rome? When Caesar was paraded before cheering Romans, a man walking behind him chanted: “Remember, you are mortal!”How wonderful it would be if our bloated politicians listened to a broken record reminding them they are just plain water absurdly reducible into a bar of laundry soap.Why do you think so many insignificant blogs and Facebook entries muddle the Internet? Why do our newspapers devote a lot of their pages to our social butterflies?A hyper ego can easily morph into narcissism, and in its crudest form as celebration of the self, it actually becomes a form of masturbation that, in its escalating practice, drains the body of its creative juices. An example of this corroding narcissism is the poet Jose Garcia Villa. By the time he was 50, he was artistically dead, unable to produce anything creative and original.To avoid this kind of self-destruct, the self must be tamed, channeled into enterprises that transcend the individual’s aspirations, his ego. It can be used not for just his glorification but for ennobling others, a community, a nation, or humanity as a whole. In the end, the egoist must be able to sacrifice, to give himself to others. The best example of this kind of egoism is no other than Jose Rizal. To emulate him we can escape the narrow compass of our own character. Indeed, writers are not excluded in the “selfie” addiction. But if writers know their roles, they will write better, think more deeply, because they will then be driven by a sense of inferiority, not so much because the greatest writers are looking over their shoulders, but because as artists, they can never compete with the Creator.This profound humility is expressed by traditional Asian artists; they purposely dent a beautiful pot, or make slight errors in the composition of their paintings, their carvings, calligraphy, as a form of homage to the Almighty.Please do not accuse me of yabang, too. Physical necessity demands I must now wear a beret. Since I lost my hair, I easily catch cold when the temperature drops. The beret is also convenient. In normal weather, I just tuck it in my pocket. As for my cane, way back when I fell on my face and dislocated an elbow, my doctor, Vince Gomez, told me to walk always with one.All of us nurture dreams, some of which are modest, some reach for the stars. An inner humility should inform us then that as earthlings created in God’s image, we are insignificant specks of dust in the infinite vastness of the universe.I am now too old and addicted to comfort and therefore incapable of epic heroism and sacrifice. But I still like to think that when it comes to humility, I am number one.SOURCE: http://www.philstar.com/sunday-life/2014/02/02/1285548/yabang-our-curse-and-undoing

kungfu-mulutan:

‘Yabang’: Our curse and undoing
HINDSIGHT By F Sionil Jose 

Yabang — boasting or showing off — is almost second nature to us. In any conversation, the Filipino suddenly pauses, declares, “Modesty aside,” then relates his journey to the top, his awards.

Here now is a caveat to all true believers of whatever institution, ideology and faith. Be not excessively proud of your mansions, your hoard of gold and mega power. Remember always that pride is followed by the fall (Book of Proverbs, 16:18).

Of course, we are all egoists. Egoism is so much a part of our humanity.

The ancient Greeks had a word for it: hubris. Writers particularly are not immune to it — in fact, with it, they flourish because from their very lives, they extract memory and give it precious form as poetry or prose.

It is yabang that makes Filipino males manicure their fingernails, splurge on elegant wardrobes and fancy cars and watches, the same way that Imelda and women with royal pretensions stretch their aging skins and festoon themselves with expensive baubles, including thousands of shoes.

It is also yabang when Corazon Aquino declared at the beginning of her presidency in 1986 that she wouldn’t welcome unsolicited advice.


Yabang again when her son, the president, said he would ignore his critics.

Listen, our historians who do not probe deeply into the character of those who shaped our history should cerebrate the way Nick Joaquin did with his A Question of Heroes. Not that Nick was absolutely correct but by raking into the egos of our heroes, he initiated an insightful way of how to interpret our past.

The revolution of 1896 was subverted by the pompous egos, the rivalry of its leaders, particularly Aguinaldo. Divided and disaffected, they were easily cozened into impotence by Spanish bribery in the Pact of Biak-na-Bato.

The Huk uprising in 1949-1953 was defeated not so much by Ramon Magsaysay and an invigorated Army; it was destroyed by the quarrels among its leaders, conflicts inflamed by conceit more than differences in tactics and ideology.

And again, the defeat of the New People’s Army was made inevitable by the vaulting egos of its leaders and most of all, by the tremendous but crippling self-esteem of its founder, Jose Maria Sison.

So it is with our political parties; they splinter soon enough into factions or new parties. This divisiveness argues perhaps for a parliamentary system. It also illustrates clearly what prevents our people from uniting.

Professional societies are sooner or later fractured by the ego of their leaders. Everyone wants to be president, chairman, CEO; no one wants to be a mere follower. Now we are praying for a messiah to descend from upstairs and deliver us from this despicable chaos. But everyone wants to be that messiah.

We all know of General Angelo Reyes’ suicide a few years back. That was egoism, too, albeit with the nobility of the brave and conscientious. He had declared that he did not start the corruption in the Armed Forces but that he couldn’t stop it. How could he when the highest official of the land was corrupt?

“Men,” he told me, “have specific roles in life.” Knowing he couldn’t fulfill it, the end he chose for himself was the most honorable. How many of our leaders can act like he did?

So then, we must know our own roles. We should also know the roles that others play, and the rules such roles follow. In this manner, social harmony is maintained. It is when we overstep our roles, or act without knowing them, that social anarchy ensues.

The Japanese adhere solemnly to their roles. I was invited to a seminar in the Eighties by the Japan Foreign Office (Gaimusho). It was a small seminar with only about a dozen of us from Asia. At its conclusion we were invited to visit Kyoto to see a portion of the Imperial Palace that was closed to the public but opened only for us. About a dozen officials from the Foreign Office went with us. When we arrived in Kyoto, the guard was shown the list of those who could enter the premises. He allowed only us participants — the Gaimusho VIPs and former ambassadors meekly followed the guard’s orders; they did not pull rank or intimidate him.

Now here comes the Mayor of Makati and that imbroglio with the Dasmariñas Village security guards. He should have understood their role as well as his. As mayor, was there an emergency or something truly urgent that required him to undermine the role of the guards? And so today, although the 2016 elections are still so far away, the mayor’s father, Vice President Jejomar Binay, is already the object of negative speculation: Will he be like his son? Will the Binays who are already in seats of power be mayabang, too? Abangan!

All dictators, the rich and famous, to the lowest security guard who holds a gun, easily forget that power is transitory. Death, the great leveler, tells us we cannot take anything with us — not the proud mansions and giant coliseums we build, least of all a single medal. How was it in ancient Rome? When Caesar was paraded before cheering Romans, a man walking behind him chanted: “Remember, you are mortal!”

How wonderful it would be if our bloated politicians listened to a broken record reminding them they are just plain water absurdly reducible into a bar of laundry soap.

Why do you think so many insignificant blogs and Facebook entries muddle the Internet? Why do our newspapers devote a lot of their pages to our social butterflies?

A hyper ego can easily morph into narcissism, and in its crudest form as celebration of the self, it actually becomes a form of masturbation that, in its escalating practice, drains the body of its creative juices. An example of this corroding narcissism is the poet Jose Garcia Villa. By the time he was 50, he was artistically dead, unable to produce anything creative and original.

To avoid this kind of self-destruct, the self must be tamed, channeled into enterprises that transcend the individual’s aspirations, his ego. It can be used not for just his glorification but for ennobling others, a community, a nation, or humanity as a whole. In the end, the egoist must be able to sacrifice, to give himself to others. The best example of this kind of egoism is no other than Jose Rizal. To emulate him we can escape the narrow compass of our own character. Indeed, writers are not excluded in the “selfie” addiction. But if writers know their roles, they will write better, think more deeply, because they will then be driven by a sense of inferiority, not so much because the greatest writers are looking over their shoulders, but because as artists, they can never compete with the Creator.

This profound humility is expressed by traditional Asian artists; they purposely dent a beautiful pot, or make slight errors in the composition of their paintings, their carvings, calligraphy, as a form of homage to the Almighty.

Please do not accuse me of yabang, too. Physical necessity demands I must now wear a beret. Since I lost my hair, I easily catch cold when the temperature drops. The beret is also convenient. In normal weather, I just tuck it in my pocket. As for my cane, way back when I fell on my face and dislocated an elbow, my doctor, Vince Gomez, told me to walk always with one.

All of us nurture dreams, some of which are modest, some reach for the stars. An inner humility should inform us then that as earthlings created in God’s image, we are insignificant specks of dust in the infinite vastness of the universe.

I am now too old and addicted to comfort and therefore incapable of epic heroism and sacrifice. But I still like to think that when it comes to humility, I am number one.

SOURCE: http://www.philstar.com/sunday-life/2014/02/02/1285548/yabang-our-curse-and-undoing

kungfu-mulutan:

Why we are so corruptHINDSIGHT By F Sionil Jose At lunch the other day, the cultural activist and stage star Joy Virata asked two very important questions. I have mulled over them for so long, I think I have some of the answers, most of which are based on our history, our nature as Filipinos and our economic system. I am only too aware, of course, of the Marxist injunction that this economic system itself determines our culture.I’m pushing on to 90 — Ms. Virata must have considered this when she asked, is there any difference between politics of yesteryear and today? And the other more telling question is, why we have declined morally, why we are so corrupt.Being this ancient, I must be forgiven for my nostalgia and tenacious clinging to a past that has been enhanced by a little knowledge of history. I remember what the historian William Henry Scott told me — how he came across an inventory in the 1896 revolution listing down broken pens, battered chairs, the trivia put down by outgoing bureaucrats illustrating their honesty. In the Thirties, politicians spent their own money for their election campaign. Many of them were impoverished by their aspiration to be town mayor, congressman or governor. Not now — politicians make money at the very beginning when they campaign. How did they go about then? I fondly remember the former Secretary of Health, Dr. Juan Salcedo, going to Pangasinan in a non-airconditioned Pantranco bus, Cabinet Secretaries Conrado Estrella and Emmanuel Pelaez travelling without any escort, Senator Juan Flavier using public transport. Not the officials today — from the simple city mayor who goes around with a fleet of security vehicles. Look at the composition of the Senate in the Fifties — they were intellectuals, writers, Recto, Tanada, Pelaez, Manglapus and so on. Yes, there was one movie star — Rogelio dela Rosa but he was circumspect, competent enough to be ambassador, too.Look at Senators today, and weep.Yes, indeed, how can any Filipino today escape this plague that has drained us of courage to fight it, that has rendered us apathetic and submissive?Corruption now pervades our very lives. We see it in the conduct of our highest elected officials, our police officers, in the justice system that is in shambles. After all that pork barrel noise in Congress, why is no one in jail? The Ampatuan massacre — why, after four years, there is no court verdict? The daily murders —many of them are unreported. And the public apathy and cynicism.I have an explanation, which I know is incomplete for there are iron realities that aggravate the Filipino metastasis — the poverty which has forced so many to steal, the hypocrisy inherent in Filipino relationships, our pakikisama, wherein we don’t ostracize the corrupt but instead greet them with handshakes and smiles. Our cowardice even — all these basically obstruct the creation of a just society.But first, the trauma of history.It is quite correct to ascribe so many evils in our society as accruements of a colonial past. We must bear in mind though that the colonialists are gone, that though vestiges of colonialism remain, as the Spanish writer Salvador de Madariaga stated, a country need not be colonized by a foreign power — it can well be a colony of its own elites and leaders. And this is what we have become.The past hundred years or so have sorely tested us as a people aspiring to be a nation. In 1896 after the execution of Jose Rizal by the Spaniards, the revolution broke out only to be sold out by a weakened leadership in the Pact of Biak na Bato. That struggle was resuscitated when the Americans came in 1898. We fought them, too, but the ragtag revolutionary Army was beaten and we became an American colony.In both wars, our patriotism, our unity as a people were tested on the battlefield, our morale succumbed but far more demeaning was the moral decay.In that period when Filipino leadership was under siege, Apolinario Mabini provided it with a stern moral leadership. This was his singular role, but his voice was not heeded by no less than the president, General Emilio Aguinaldo, who was surrounded by the rich ilustrados. They wanted Mabini’s influence totally banished, so that they could enrich themselves and negotiate with the new imperialists.We see then from the very beginning of the Malolos Republic this fatal virus that afflicts us — the acceptance of collaboration with the enemy for personal gain.It was the same when the second trauma ravaged us — the Japanese invasion in 1942 and the brutal three-year occupation. So many Filipinos collaborated with them, some out of sincere belief that they would relieve Asia from Western colonialism, but most, simply to preserve their privileged status and profit from collaboration.How was collaboration with the Nazis in Europe in World War II resolved? The Danes started killing the collaborators even before the collapse of Nazi Germany. The French hounded them, jailed them.In the Philippines, many of them even proclaimed themselves patriots. They were granted amnesty. As a political issue, therefore, collaboration with the Japanese was settled but it continues to fester today as a moral issue.Were the collaborators ever bothered? Hardly, I think, because they know we are not bound by moral scruples.Then martial law. So many of us knew it was coming and some even welcomed it. As for the very poor, the masa — it was not their real concern. As one put it, he didn’t care if it was the devil himself who ruled as long as food was cheap.Again, many Filipinos accepted the edict; they even worked gladly for Marcos, legitimized his regime and willfully contributed to the violence, the death, imprisonment and torture of thousands.In all these three traumatic events in our history, the collaborators with our exploiters were never really punished. They ended up rich, and successfully masqueraded as heroes. The evil that imperialists and Marcos did was soon forgotten. We see now the Marcoses and so many of their hirelings back in power, sneering at our credulity.What then does history tell us?In these man-made disasters that wrought havoc on otherwise stable and just societies, the rules of conduct, of ethics were thrown out of the window as the powerful dictator, king, bureaucrat, imperial agent exploited the people and the land. Each individual must survive; he becomes an animal in the jungle; he gets used to the violence, the corruption, the lying and the cheating as normal human traits; he adapts to them, even exploits them if he can. Forget truth, God, the wrath of the heavens — there is only he and his family.In this decadent atmosphere, it is difficult to recover virtue. And if the disaster strikes again after it is surmounted, the individual is immersed deeper into the slime so that eventually, he is totally submerged in it, he no longer knows what it feels to breathe the fresh air, to appreciate green living things, to know God and the infinite splendor of creation. He knows only the fetid darkness.Today, for all hosannas evoked by the seeming development in the economy, we need to think not of the future, but of the past which impacts on today.There is one great failing of government, from Cory’s to her son’s which is not lost on the national consciousness — and this is the resolution of the assassination of Ninoy Aquino. No one seriously believes that those soldiers who were imprisoned for the crime were the real perpetrators. Someone upstairs, powerful and well connected masterminded it all, as well as the cover-up murders of several people who were supposed to be in the know.What our leaders do not realize is the gravity of the murder of Ninoy Aquino, not so much because of the man’s political ambition, but the perception today that murder has become so common — a daily occurrence as blatantly evidenced in the newspapers but that this government — the whole justice system — is so rotten it cannot even resolve such a high profile murder case wherein it should not be difficult to target the perpetrator.Such a crime — without being fully resolved — contributes to the apathy of people, their acceptance of crime as the last nail in the coffin of the Filipino dream.The assassination of Ninoy is not just a domestic crime — it is known all over the world, it is blot on the image of the Filipino nation as it illustrates to the whole world the rottenness of the Filipino justice system. If there is no justice for Ninoy Aquino, how can there be justice for poor, anonymous Juan?If President PNoy knows, he does not say — which is, of course, the most damning of all because he is the son.What aggravates our moral decay is our very nature, our sociability and hypocrisy. Although we are familiar with the crimes of our leaders, we continue to fete them, invite them in social functions, often bonded as they are with us not just by social ties but by gratitude for what these politicians must have done for us.Then, of course, there is this economic system which is propelled by consumerism and untrammeled greed.The last question: Is there no hope for Filipinos then?The answer is with our youth. I always tell them, our heroes who wrote our history with their blood were all very young, in their twenties and thirties. For sure, many of the ilustrados joined the revolution for themselves. But Rizal, Mabini, Bonifacio and so many others did not.And we are a talented people, as illustrated no less by Rizal. No country in Asia has ever produced a man like him. When we celebrate his birthday next week, just remember, he was a novelist, a sculptor, a medical doctor, a scholar, a teacher and a martyr at 35 when the Spaniards executed him.SOURCE: http://www.philstar.com/sunday-life/2014/06/08/1332164/why-we-are-so-corrupt

kungfu-mulutan:

Why we are so corrupt
HINDSIGHT By F Sionil Jose 

At lunch the other day, the cultural activist and stage star Joy Virata asked two very important questions. I have mulled over them for so long, I think I have some of the answers, most of which are based on our history, our nature as Filipinos and our economic system. I am only too aware, of course, of the Marxist injunction that this economic system itself determines our culture.

I’m pushing on to 90 — Ms. Virata must have considered this when she asked, is there any difference between politics of yesteryear and today? And the other more telling question is, why we have declined morally, why we are so corrupt.

Being this ancient, I must be forgiven for my nostalgia and tenacious clinging to a past that has been enhanced by a little knowledge of history. I remember what the historian William Henry Scott told me — how he came across an inventory in the 1896 revolution listing down broken pens, battered chairs, the trivia put down by outgoing bureaucrats illustrating their honesty. In the Thirties, politicians spent their own money for their election campaign. Many of them were impoverished by their aspiration to be town mayor, congressman or governor. Not now — politicians make money at the very beginning when they campaign. How did they go about then? I fondly remember the former Secretary of Health, Dr. Juan Salcedo, going to Pangasinan in a non-airconditioned Pantranco bus, Cabinet Secretaries Conrado Estrella and Emmanuel Pelaez travelling without any escort, Senator Juan Flavier using public transport. Not the officials today — from the simple city mayor who goes around with a fleet of security vehicles. Look at the composition of the Senate in the Fifties — they were intellectuals, writers, Recto, Tanada, Pelaez, Manglapus and so on. Yes, there was one movie star — Rogelio dela Rosa but he was circumspect, competent enough to be ambassador, too.

Look at Senators today, and weep.

Yes, indeed, how can any Filipino today escape this plague that has drained us of courage to fight it, that has rendered us apathetic and submissive?

Corruption now pervades our very lives. We see it in the conduct of our highest elected officials, our police officers, in the justice system that is in shambles. After all that pork barrel noise in Congress, why is no one in jail? The Ampatuan massacre — why, after four years, there is no court verdict? The daily murders —many of them are unreported. And the public apathy and cynicism.


I have an explanation, which I know is incomplete for there are iron realities that aggravate the Filipino metastasis — the poverty which has forced so many to steal, the hypocrisy inherent in Filipino relationships, our pakikisama, wherein we don’t ostracize the corrupt but instead greet them with handshakes and smiles. Our cowardice even — all these basically obstruct the creation of a just society.

But first, the trauma of history.

It is quite correct to ascribe so many evils in our society as accruements of a colonial past. We must bear in mind though that the colonialists are gone, that though vestiges of colonialism remain, as the Spanish writer Salvador de Madariaga stated, a country need not be colonized by a foreign power — it can well be a colony of its own elites and leaders. And this is what we have become.

The past hundred years or so have sorely tested us as a people aspiring to be a nation. In 1896 after the execution of Jose Rizal by the Spaniards, the revolution broke out only to be sold out by a weakened leadership in the Pact of Biak na Bato. That struggle was resuscitated when the Americans came in 1898. We fought them, too, but the ragtag revolutionary Army was beaten and we became an American colony.

In both wars, our patriotism, our unity as a people were tested on the battlefield, our morale succumbed but far more demeaning was the moral decay.

In that period when Filipino leadership was under siege, Apolinario Mabini provided it with a stern moral leadership. This was his singular role, but his voice was not heeded by no less than the president, General Emilio Aguinaldo, who was surrounded by the rich ilustrados. They wanted Mabini’s influence totally banished, so that they could enrich themselves and negotiate with the new imperialists.

We see then from the very beginning of the Malolos Republic this fatal virus that afflicts us — the acceptance of collaboration with the enemy for personal gain.

It was the same when the second trauma ravaged us — the Japanese invasion in 1942 and the brutal three-year occupation. So many Filipinos collaborated with them, some out of sincere belief that they would relieve Asia from Western colonialism, but most, simply to preserve their privileged status and profit from collaboration.

How was collaboration with the Nazis in Europe in World War II resolved? The Danes started killing the collaborators even before the collapse of Nazi Germany. The French hounded them, jailed them.

In the Philippines, many of them even proclaimed themselves patriots. They were granted amnesty. As a political issue, therefore, collaboration with the Japanese was settled but it continues to fester today as a moral issue.

Were the collaborators ever bothered? Hardly, I think, because they know we are not bound by moral scruples.

Then martial law. So many of us knew it was coming and some even welcomed it. As for the very poor, the masa — it was not their real concern. As one put it, he didn’t care if it was the devil himself who ruled as long as food was cheap.

Again, many Filipinos accepted the edict; they even worked gladly for Marcos, legitimized his regime and willfully contributed to the violence, the death, imprisonment and torture of thousands.

In all these three traumatic events in our history, the collaborators with our exploiters were never really punished. They ended up rich, and successfully masqueraded as heroes. The evil that imperialists and Marcos did was soon forgotten. We see now the Marcoses and so many of their hirelings back in power, sneering at our credulity.

What then does history tell us?

In these man-made disasters that wrought havoc on otherwise stable and just societies, the rules of conduct, of ethics were thrown out of the window as the powerful dictator, king, bureaucrat, imperial agent exploited the people and the land. Each individual must survive; he becomes an animal in the jungle; he gets used to the violence, the corruption, the lying and the cheating as normal human traits; he adapts to them, even exploits them if he can. Forget truth, God, the wrath of the heavens — there is only he and his family.

In this decadent atmosphere, it is difficult to recover virtue. And if the disaster strikes again after it is surmounted, the individual is immersed deeper into the slime so that eventually, he is totally submerged in it, he no longer knows what it feels to breathe the fresh air, to appreciate green living things, to know God and the infinite splendor of creation. He knows only the fetid darkness.

Today, for all hosannas evoked by the seeming development in the economy, we need to think not of the future, but of the past which impacts on today.

There is one great failing of government, from Cory’s to her son’s which is not lost on the national consciousness — and this is the resolution of the assassination of Ninoy Aquino. No one seriously believes that those soldiers who were imprisoned for the crime were the real perpetrators. Someone upstairs, powerful and well connected masterminded it all, as well as the cover-up murders of several people who were supposed to be in the know.

What our leaders do not realize is the gravity of the murder of Ninoy Aquino, not so much because of the man’s political ambition, but the perception today that murder has become so common — a daily occurrence as blatantly evidenced in the newspapers but that this government — the whole justice system — is so rotten it cannot even resolve such a high profile murder case wherein it should not be difficult to target the perpetrator.

Such a crime — without being fully resolved — contributes to the apathy of people, their acceptance of crime as the last nail in the coffin of the Filipino dream.

The assassination of Ninoy is not just a domestic crime — it is known all over the world, it is blot on the image of the Filipino nation as it illustrates to the whole world the rottenness of the Filipino justice system. If there is no justice for Ninoy Aquino, how can there be justice for poor, anonymous Juan?

If President PNoy knows, he does not say — which is, of course, the most damning of all because he is the son.

What aggravates our moral decay is our very nature, our sociability and hypocrisy. Although we are familiar with the crimes of our leaders, we continue to fete them, invite them in social functions, often bonded as they are with us not just by social ties but by gratitude for what these politicians must have done for us.

Then, of course, there is this economic system which is propelled by consumerism and untrammeled greed.

The last question: Is there no hope for Filipinos then?

The answer is with our youth. I always tell them, our heroes who wrote our history with their blood were all very young, in their twenties and thirties. For sure, many of the ilustrados joined the revolution for themselves. But Rizal, Mabini, Bonifacio and so many others did not.

And we are a talented people, as illustrated no less by Rizal. No country in Asia has ever produced a man like him. When we celebrate his birthday next week, just remember, he was a novelist, a sculptor, a medical doctor, a scholar, a teacher and a martyr at 35 when the Spaniards executed him.

SOURCE: http://www.philstar.com/sunday-life/2014/06/08/1332164/why-we-are-so-corrupt

kungfu-mulutan:

Kolonyal at Elitistang EdukasyonPluma at Papel ni Rogelio L. OrdoñezSAPAGKAT KINOPYA nang pira-piraso mula sa edukasyong Amerikano ang ating edukasyon gayong hindi naman katugma ang ating ekonomiya ng industriyalisadong ekonomiya ng Estados Unidos, hindi nito matugunan hanggang ngayon ang mga pangangailangan ng bansa tungo sa kaunlaran at, sa halip, naging instrumento pa ito ng pang-aaliping pangkaisipan. Higit pang masama, mga korporasyong multi-nasyonal at dayuhang mga interes ang nakikinabang lamang sa talino at lakas-paggawa ng mga nagsisipagtapos sa kolehiyo na hindi naman tinutumbasan ng makatarungang suweldo.Natural, dahil mga Amerikano ang naggiit ng kasalukuyang edukasyong Pilipino, isinalaksak sa ating utak ang mga pagpapahalagang maka-Amerikano kaya dinadakila natin hindi lamang ang kanilang lahi, wika, kasaysayan at kultura kundi maging ang kanilang mga produkto. Ikinadena pa ang pambansang liderato, pinanatiling tagahimod ng kuyukot ni Uncle Sam kaya sunud-sunuran sa dikta ng mga diyus-diyosan sa Washington — pampulitika man o pangkabuhayan o anumang mga patakarang pabor lamang sa makasariling interes ng Amerika.Samantalang umunlad, at patuloy na umuunlad, ang maraming bansa sa daigdig — tulad ng Alemanya, Pransiya, Rusya, Tsina at Japan — hindi sa pamamagitan ng paggamit sa wikang Ingles sa kanilang edukasyon kundi ng kani-kanilang wika, banyagang wikang Ingles pa rin ang nangingibabaw sa ating edukasyon. Umiiral tuloy, at isang malaking kahangalan, ang elitistang pananaw na “hindi edukado” at itinuturing nang bobo ang hindi mahusay sa lengguwahe ni Uncle Sam gayong ang sukatan ng katalinuhan ay wala sa wikang ginagamit kundi nasa laman ng isip.Sa larangang pangkultura, ayon nga sa mananalaysay na si Stanley Karnow, lumikha tayo ng mga Pilipinong Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, Tom Jones o Michael Jackson, at iba pa. Nagsulputan ang makabagong mga Donya Victorina ng Noli at Fili ni Rizal — nagpatangos ng ilong, nagpaputi ng kutis, nagpa-blonde ng buhok, nagpalaki ng suso at pabalbal na nagpipilit mag-Ingles kahit mga Pilipino ang kausap. Kahit sa mga awitin at pelikula, malinaw na hinuhuwad natin ang kultura ng mga Yankee.Sa halip na isulong ng walang gulugod na pambansang liderato ang siyensiya at teknolohiya tungo sa industriyalisasyon ng bansa, naiiwan tuloy ang Pilipinas sa larangang ito ng mga 50 taon kung ihahambing sa mauunlad na bansa sa Asya at mga 100 taon naman ng industriyalisadong mga bansa sa Kanluran.Nakakainsulto tuloy na saranggola pa lamang ang kaya nating gawin gayong nagmamanupaktura na ng kanilang mga eroplano ang Tsina, Japan o Korea. Rebentador lamang at dinamita ang nagagawa natin samantalang bomba atomika ang nalikha ng India. May “ballistic missile” ang Hilagang Korea, ngunit tayo’y kuwitis pa rin magpahanggang ngayon na hindi pa sumasagitsit paitaas kung minsan. Kung may “cosmonaut” at “astronaut” ang Rusya at Amerika na nakapaglalakbay sa kalawakan o nakararating sa buwan, mayroon daw naman tayong mga aswang at manananggal. Samantalang gumagawa at nagbebenta ng mga sasakyan — bus man o kotse — ang Korea at Japan, tagapulot naman tayo ng basurang mga makina at piyesa ng sasakyan upang lagyan ng kaha at maging mga behikulong pamasada.Kahit sagana ang bansa sa mina ng bakal at asero, hindi pa tayo makagawa ng simpleng pako o karayom at bumibili pa ng lagari, pait, katam at martilyo mula sa ibang mga bansa, o ng iba pang mga produktong puwede namang tayo na ang lumikha.Ano nga ba ang naidulot sa bansa ng edukasyong Pilipinong kinopya nang pira-piraso sa edukasyong Amerikano?Malinaw na pinatindi lamang ng edukasyong ito ang kaisipang kolonyal at elitistang pananaw, pinanatiling atrasado ang bansa, at naging pabrika lamang ang pangmayamang mga kolehiyo at unibersidad ng henerasyon ng mga lider na mandurugas, makadayuhan at may kaisipang-alipin, walang pambansang damdamin o malasakit para sa pambansang kapakanan.Sabagay, gusto namang talaga ng mga bansang industriyalisado — lalo na ng Estados Unidos — na manatiling bitukang agrikultural lamang nila ang Pilipinas, huwag maging industriyalisado, upang palaging umasa sa importasyon at maging tambakan ng sobra nilang mga produkto, lason man o gamot o pagkain, punglo man o baril, eroplano man o tangke.Kung hinahangad din lamang na umunlad ang bansa at makita kahit anino ng industriyalisasyon, makabubuti marahil na ituwid muna ang ating kasaysayang kolonyal at ganap na wasakin ang balangkas o sistema ng umiiral na edukasyon at lipunan. Lubhang napapanahon na, sabi nga, na pagsumikapang isulong at pairalin ang isang edukasyong tunay na maka-Pilipino, makatao, makabayan at siyentipiko na makatutugon at angkop sa pambansang mga pangangailangan tungo sa tunay na kaunlaran, kalayaan at kasarinlan.SOURCE: http://pinoyweekly.org/new/2014/06/kolonyal-at-elitistang-edukasyon/

kungfu-mulutan:

Kolonyal at Elitistang Edukasyon
Pluma at Papel ni Rogelio L. Ordoñez

SAPAGKAT KINOPYA nang pira-piraso mula sa edukasyong Amerikano ang ating edukasyon gayong hindi naman katugma ang ating ekonomiya ng industriyalisadong ekonomiya ng Estados Unidos, hindi nito matugunan hanggang ngayon ang mga pangangailangan ng bansa tungo sa kaunlaran at, sa halip, naging instrumento pa ito ng pang-aaliping pangkaisipan. Higit pang masama, mga korporasyong multi-nasyonal at dayuhang mga interes ang nakikinabang lamang sa talino at lakas-paggawa ng mga nagsisipagtapos sa kolehiyo na hindi naman tinutumbasan ng makatarungang suweldo.

Natural, dahil mga Amerikano ang naggiit ng kasalukuyang edukasyong Pilipino, isinalaksak sa ating utak ang mga pagpapahalagang maka-Amerikano kaya dinadakila natin hindi lamang ang kanilang lahi, wika, kasaysayan at kultura kundi maging ang kanilang mga produkto. Ikinadena pa ang pambansang liderato, pinanatiling tagahimod ng kuyukot ni Uncle Sam kaya sunud-sunuran sa dikta ng mga diyus-diyosan sa Washington — pampulitika man o pangkabuhayan o anumang mga patakarang pabor lamang sa makasariling interes ng Amerika.

Samantalang umunlad, at patuloy na umuunlad, ang maraming bansa sa daigdig — tulad ng Alemanya, Pransiya, Rusya, Tsina at Japan — hindi sa pamamagitan ng paggamit sa wikang Ingles sa kanilang edukasyon kundi ng kani-kanilang wika, banyagang wikang Ingles pa rin ang nangingibabaw sa ating edukasyon. Umiiral tuloy, at isang malaking kahangalan, ang elitistang pananaw na “hindi edukado” at itinuturing nang bobo ang hindi mahusay sa lengguwahe ni Uncle Sam gayong ang sukatan ng katalinuhan ay wala sa wikang ginagamit kundi nasa laman ng isip.

Sa larangang pangkultura, ayon nga sa mananalaysay na si Stanley Karnow, lumikha tayo ng mga Pilipinong Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, Tom Jones o Michael Jackson, at iba pa. Nagsulputan ang makabagong mga Donya Victorina ng Noli at Fili ni Rizal — nagpatangos ng ilong, nagpaputi ng kutis, nagpa-blonde ng buhok, nagpalaki ng suso at pabalbal na nagpipilit mag-Ingles kahit mga Pilipino ang kausap. Kahit sa mga awitin at pelikula, malinaw na hinuhuwad natin ang kultura ng mga Yankee.

Sa halip na isulong ng walang gulugod na pambansang liderato ang siyensiya at teknolohiya tungo sa industriyalisasyon ng bansa, naiiwan tuloy ang Pilipinas sa larangang ito ng mga 50 taon kung ihahambing sa mauunlad na bansa sa Asya at mga 100 taon naman ng industriyalisadong mga bansa sa Kanluran.

Nakakainsulto tuloy na saranggola pa lamang ang kaya nating gawin gayong nagmamanupaktura na ng kanilang mga eroplano ang Tsina, Japan o Korea. Rebentador lamang at dinamita ang nagagawa natin samantalang bomba atomika ang nalikha ng India. May “ballistic missile” ang Hilagang Korea, ngunit tayo’y kuwitis pa rin magpahanggang ngayon na hindi pa sumasagitsit paitaas kung minsan. Kung may “cosmonaut” at “astronaut” ang Rusya at Amerika na nakapaglalakbay sa kalawakan o nakararating sa buwan, mayroon daw naman tayong mga aswang at manananggal. Samantalang gumagawa at nagbebenta ng mga sasakyan — bus man o kotse — ang Korea at Japan, tagapulot naman tayo ng basurang mga makina at piyesa ng sasakyan upang lagyan ng kaha at maging mga behikulong pamasada.

Kahit sagana ang bansa sa mina ng bakal at asero, hindi pa tayo makagawa ng simpleng pako o karayom at bumibili pa ng lagari, pait, katam at martilyo mula sa ibang mga bansa, o ng iba pang mga produktong puwede namang tayo na ang lumikha.

Ano nga ba ang naidulot sa bansa ng edukasyong Pilipinong kinopya nang pira-piraso sa edukasyong Amerikano?
Malinaw na pinatindi lamang ng edukasyong ito ang kaisipang kolonyal at elitistang pananaw, pinanatiling atrasado ang bansa, at naging pabrika lamang ang pangmayamang mga kolehiyo at unibersidad ng henerasyon ng mga lider na mandurugas, makadayuhan at may kaisipang-alipin, walang pambansang damdamin o malasakit para sa pambansang kapakanan.

Sabagay, gusto namang talaga ng mga bansang industriyalisado — lalo na ng Estados Unidos — na manatiling bitukang agrikultural lamang nila ang Pilipinas, huwag maging industriyalisado, upang palaging umasa sa importasyon at maging tambakan ng sobra nilang mga produkto, lason man o gamot o pagkain, punglo man o baril, eroplano man o tangke.

Kung hinahangad din lamang na umunlad ang bansa at makita kahit anino ng industriyalisasyon, makabubuti marahil na ituwid muna ang ating kasaysayang kolonyal at ganap na wasakin ang balangkas o sistema ng umiiral na edukasyon at lipunan. Lubhang napapanahon na, sabi nga, na pagsumikapang isulong at pairalin ang isang edukasyong tunay na maka-Pilipino, makatao, makabayan at siyentipiko na makatutugon at angkop sa pambansang mga pangangailangan tungo sa tunay na kaunlaran, kalayaan at kasarinlan.

SOURCE: http://pinoyweekly.org/new/2014/06/kolonyal-at-elitistang-edukasyon/

kungfu-mulutan:




WHY WE ARE SHALLOWHINDSIGHT By F Sionil Jose I was visited by an old Asian friend who lived here 10 years ago. I was floored by his observation that though we have lots of talented people, as a whole, we continue to be shallow.Recently, I was seated beside former Senator Letty Shahani, PhD in Comparative Literature from the Sorbonne, watching a medley of Asian dances. The stately and classical Japanese number with stylized movements which perhaps took years to master elicited what seemed to me grudging applause. Then, the Filipino tinikling which any one can learn in 10 minutes; after all that energetic jumping, an almost standing ovation. Letty turned to me and asked, “Why are we so shallow?”Yes, indeed, and for how long?This is a question which I have asked myself, which I hope all of us should ask ourselves every so often. Once we have answered it, then we will move on to a more elevated sensibility. And with this sensibility, we will then be able to deny the highest positions in government to those nincompoops who have nothing going for them except popularity, what an irresponsible and equally shallow media had created. As my foreign friend said, there is nothing to read in our major papers.Again, why are we shallow?There are so many reasons. One lies in our educational system which has diminished not just scholarship but excellence. There is less emphasis now on the humanities, in the study of the classics which enables us to have a broader grasp of our past and the philosophies of this past. I envy those Hindus and Buddhists who have in their religion philosophy and ancestor worship which build in the believer a continuity with the past, and that most important ingredient in the building of a nation — memory.Lifestyle Feature ( Article MRec ), pagematch: 1, sectionmatch:Sure, our Christian faith, too, has a philosophical tradition, particularly if we connect it to the ancient Greeks and Romans. Remember, the first Bible was in Greek. But Greek, Latin and the classics in these languages are no longer taught in our schools the way these are still studied in many universities in Europe.We are shallow because we are mayabang, ego driven, and do not have the humility to understand that we are only human, much too human to mistake knowledge for wisdom. We can see this yabang in some of our public commentators, particularly on TV — the know-it-alls who think that because they have so much knowledge — available now on the Web at the click of a button — they can answer every question posed to them. What they do not realize is that knowledge is not wisdom. Until they recognize that important if sometimes awful difference, they will continue to bluster their way to the top at our expense because we, the people, will then have to suffer their arrogance and ignorance.We are shallow because with this arrogance, we accept positions far beyond our competence. Because there is no critical tradition in this country — a tradition which will easily separate the chaff from the grain, we cannot recognize fakery from the real goods. That outstanding scholar, Wilfredo Villacorta, is a rare bird indeed; when offered a high position in government, he refused it because he knew he was not qualified for the job. Any other mayabang academic would have grabbed it although he knows he can’t handle it. And so it happens always — the nitwits who hold such high positions stubbornly hold on to their posts, bamboozling their subordinates who may be brighter than them for that is the only way those who are inferior feel they can have respect.On the other hand, the intelligent person will be aware of his shortcomings. He does not hesitate to ask the opinion of those who know more than him on particular subjects. If he is a government hierarch, he will surround himself with advisers who he knows can supply him with guidance and background possessing as they do more knowledge, experience and wisdom than him. Such an official is bound to commit fewer mistakes because he knows himself.We are shallow because we lack this most important knowledge — who we are and the limits to what we can do.We also lack the perception, and the courage, for instance, to deny these religious quacks and the thousands who listen and believe in them. Sure, religion is the opium of the masses as Marx said. So then, how can we prevent the masa from taking this poison without recognizing their right to make fools of themselves? Again, shallowness because the good people are silent. Ubi boni tacent, malum prosperat. Where good men are silent, evil prospers.This shallowness is the impediment to prosperity, to justice, and men of goodwill should emphasize this, take risks even in doing so. As the late Salvador P. Lopez said, “It is better to be silenced than to be silent.”We are shallow because our media are so horribly shallow. Every morning, I peruse the papers and there is so little to read in them. It is the same with radio — all that noise, that artifice.I turn on the TV on prime time and what do I get? Five juvenile commentators gushing over the amors of movie stars, who is shacking up with whom. One of the blabbering panelists I distinctly remember was caught cheating some years back at some movie award. How could she still be on TV after that moral destruct? And the telenovelas, how utterly asinine, bizarre, foolish, insipid moronic and mephitic they are! And there are so many talented writers in our vernaculars and in English as the Palanca Awards show every year — why aren’t they harnessed for TV? Those TV moguls have a stock answer — the ratings of these shows are very high. Popularity not quality is their final arbiter. They give our people garbage and they are now giving it back to all of us in kind! So I must not be blamed if, most of the time, I turn on BBC. Aljazeera, rather than the local TV channels. It is such a pleasure to read The New York Times, the San Jose Mercury News, the Washington Post, to listen to “Fresh Air” on US public radio and public TV where my ever-continuing thirst for knowledge (and good entertainment) is quenched.We are shallow because we don’t read. I go to the hospital on occasion — the long corridor is filled with people staring into the cosmos. It is only I who have brought a book or a magazine. In Japanese cities, in Korea — in the buses and trains, young and old are reading, or if they are not holding books and magazines, they are glued to their iPhones where so much information is now available.In these countries and in Western cities, the bookshops are still full, but not so much anymore because the new communications technologies are now available to their masa. How I wish my tiny bookshop or any Filipino bookshop for that matter would be filled with people. I’ll make an exception here: BookSale branches are always full because their books are very cheap. But I would still ask: what kind of books do Filipinos buy?We are shallow because we have become enslaved by gross materialism, the glitter of gold and its equivalents, for which reason we think that only the material goods of this earth can satisfy us and we must therefore grab as much as can while we are able. Enjoy all these baubles that we have accumulated; sure, it is pleasurable to possess such artifacts that make living trouble free. And that old anodyne: “Man does not live by bread alone,” who are the thinking and stubborn few who believe in it?I hope that those who read this piece still do.SOURCE: http://www.philstar.com/arts-and-culture/725822/why-we-are-shallow

kungfu-mulutan:

WHY WE ARE SHALLOW
HINDSIGHT By F Sionil Jose 

I was visited by an old Asian friend who lived here 10 years ago. I was floored by his observation that though we have lots of talented people, as a whole, we continue to be shallow.

Recently, I was seated beside former Senator Letty Shahani, PhD in Comparative Literature from the Sorbonne, watching a medley of Asian dances. The stately and classical Japanese number with stylized movements which perhaps took years to master elicited what seemed to me grudging applause. Then, the Filipino tinikling which any one can learn in 10 minutes; after all that energetic jumping, an almost standing ovation. Letty turned to me and asked, “Why are we so shallow?”

Yes, indeed, and for how long?

This is a question which I have asked myself, which I hope all of us should ask ourselves every so often. Once we have answered it, then we will move on to a more elevated sensibility. And with this sensibility, we will then be able to deny the highest positions in government to those nincompoops who have nothing going for them except popularity, what an irresponsible and equally shallow media had created. As my foreign friend said, there is nothing to read in our major papers.

Again, why are we shallow?

There are so many reasons. One lies in our educational system which has diminished not just scholarship but excellence. There is less emphasis now on the humanities, in the study of the classics which enables us to have a broader grasp of our past and the philosophies of this past. I envy those Hindus and Buddhists who have in their religion philosophy and ancestor worship which build in the believer a continuity with the past, and that most important ingredient in the building of a nation — memory.

Lifestyle Feature ( Article MRec ), pagematch: 1, sectionmatch:


Sure, our Christian faith, too, has a philosophical tradition, particularly if we connect it to the ancient Greeks and Romans. Remember, the first Bible was in Greek. But Greek, Latin and the classics in these languages are no longer taught in our schools the way these are still studied in many universities in Europe.

We are shallow because we are mayabang, ego driven, and do not have the humility to understand that we are only human, much too human to mistake knowledge for wisdom. We can see this yabang in some of our public commentators, particularly on TV — the know-it-alls who think that because they have so much knowledge — available now on the Web at the click of a button — they can answer every question posed to them. What they do not realize is that knowledge is not wisdom. Until they recognize that important if sometimes awful difference, they will continue to bluster their way to the top at our expense because we, the people, will then have to suffer their arrogance and ignorance.

We are shallow because with this arrogance, we accept positions far beyond our competence. Because there is no critical tradition in this country — a tradition which will easily separate the chaff from the grain, we cannot recognize fakery from the real goods. That outstanding scholar, Wilfredo Villacorta, is a rare bird indeed; when offered a high position in government, he refused it because he knew he was not qualified for the job. Any other mayabang academic would have grabbed it although he knows he can’t handle it. And so it happens always — the nitwits who hold such high positions stubbornly hold on to their posts, bamboozling their subordinates who may be brighter than them for that is the only way those who are inferior feel they can have respect.

On the other hand, the intelligent person will be aware of his shortcomings. He does not hesitate to ask the opinion of those who know more than him on particular subjects. If he is a government hierarch, he will surround himself with advisers who he knows can supply him with guidance and background possessing as they do more knowledge, experience and wisdom than him. Such an official is bound to commit fewer mistakes because he knows himself.

We are shallow because we lack this most important knowledge — who we are and the limits to what we can do.

We also lack the perception, and the courage, for instance, to deny these religious quacks and the thousands who listen and believe in them. Sure, religion is the opium of the masses as Marx said. So then, how can we prevent the masa from taking this poison without recognizing their right to make fools of themselves? Again, shallowness because the good people are silent. Ubi boni tacent, malum prosperat. Where good men are silent, evil prospers.

This shallowness is the impediment to prosperity, to justice, and men of goodwill should emphasize this, take risks even in doing so. As the late Salvador P. Lopez said, “It is better to be silenced than to be silent.”

We are shallow because our media are so horribly shallow. Every morning, I peruse the papers and there is so little to read in them. It is the same with radio — all that noise, that artifice.

I turn on the TV on prime time and what do I get? Five juvenile commentators gushing over the amors of movie stars, who is shacking up with whom. One of the blabbering panelists I distinctly remember was caught cheating some years back at some movie award. How could she still be on TV after that moral destruct? And the telenovelas, how utterly asinine, bizarre, foolish, insipid moronic and mephitic they are! And there are so many talented writers in our vernaculars and in English as the Palanca Awards show every year — why aren’t they harnessed for TV? Those TV moguls have a stock answer — the ratings of these shows are very high. Popularity not quality is their final arbiter. They give our people garbage and they are now giving it back to all of us in kind! So I must not be blamed if, most of the time, I turn on BBC. Aljazeera, rather than the local TV channels. It is such a pleasure to read The New York Times, the San Jose Mercury News, the Washington Post, to listen to “Fresh Air” on US public radio and public TV where my ever-continuing thirst for knowledge (and good entertainment) is quenched.

We are shallow because we don’t read. I go to the hospital on occasion — the long corridor is filled with people staring into the cosmos. It is only I who have brought a book or a magazine. In Japanese cities, in Korea — in the buses and trains, young and old are reading, or if they are not holding books and magazines, they are glued to their iPhones where so much information is now available.

In these countries and in Western cities, the bookshops are still full, but not so much anymore because the new communications technologies are now available to their masa. How I wish my tiny bookshop or any Filipino bookshop for that matter would be filled with people. I’ll make an exception here: BookSale branches are always full because their books are very cheap. But I would still ask: what kind of books do Filipinos buy?

We are shallow because we have become enslaved by gross materialism, the glitter of gold and its equivalents, for which reason we think that only the material goods of this earth can satisfy us and we must therefore grab as much as can while we are able. Enjoy all these baubles that we have accumulated; sure, it is pleasurable to possess such artifacts that make living trouble free. And that old anodyne: “Man does not live by bread alone,” who are the thinking and stubborn few who believe in it?

I hope that those who read this piece still do.

SOURCE: http://www.philstar.com/arts-and-culture/725822/why-we-are-shallow
kungfu-mulutan:

REKLAMO NAMIN KAY NOYNOY AQUINO:
(Unang binasag ng manunulat na si Norman Wilwayco ang bulok na pananaw ng mga dilawan. Ito ay sagot ng PXO sa parehas na kulumpon ng mga tanong)1. Wala na kami pambili ng bigas! Pero may pang internet kami araw-araw para batikusin ang pangulo.
PXO: Mga buwiset. Sa panahon lang ni PNoy pinakamataas ang presyo ng bigas. Gusto nyo kayo lang ang may internet?Online media na nga lang ang espasyo naming nais ng pagbabago, gusto nyo pang ipagkait dahil sa CYBERCRIME LAW. Kayo araw-araw nga nagiinternet pero para saan? bugbugin kami ng balita tungkol kay Vhong Navarro?2. Ang mahal ng tuition di na namin mapag aral mga anak namin! Pero nakabili kami ng tiket worth 18k para makapanood sila ng One Direction concert.PXO: Bakit nyo ba hinahayaang tumaas ang tuition fee? Di ba KARAPATAN ang edukasyon? Tapos sabi nyo huwag na kaming magprivate kung ayaw namin ng tuition fee.Pag lumipat naman kami, ang taas pa rin ang singil. Eh sa EARIST (isang state college), tinutulan nila ang mataas na singil, anong ginawa ng admin? Blacklisted ang a 30+ estudyante na lumaban. Ano’ng gusto nyo? Kayo lang ang edukado? Mahiya naman kayo kay Krystel Tejada. Tsaka di namin kayang bumili ng 1D ticket. Kung P400,000 na bulok na computer kayang kaya niyong bilhin, 1D ticket pa kaya?3. Ang dumi ng Maynila kasalanan ni Noyoy to! Pero kami rin naman ang nagkakalat ng mga basura.PXO: Sa totoo lang mas matindi magkalat si Kris Aquino. 4. Di namin kaya buhayin mga anak namin! Tatlo lang talaga ang kaya naming buhayin pero syam kasi ang anak namin.PXO: Binubuhay namin ang mga anak namin sa sariling sikap, hindi sa pagnakaw ng pinaghirapan ng iba. Hindi overpopulation ang problema kundi yung sobrang katakawan nyo. Kahit 2 lang ang tao sa Pilipinas, kung kinakain ni Juan ang para kay Pedro, gutom pa rin ang kalalabasan. Teka, san niyo ba nakuha ang datos nyo? Makisalamuha din sa masa pag may time.5. Ang bilis maubos ng sahod! Pero sa tuwing may sahod diretso na agad kami sa mall para makapagshopping, sabay party sa gabi.PXO: Ang binabanggit mo ay yung lifestyle ni Kris Aquino. Hindi kami ganun. Wala kayong kwenta. Si Noynoy at si Mar deretso sa mall kapag ninakawan ng barya si Henry Sy. Yang mga may ari ng mall na sina Henry Sy at Ayala ang may pinakamalaking pakinabang sa panunungkulan ninyo. Kami ba ang nagbigay ng permit na gumawa sila ng sandamakmak na mall sa EDSA na din namin kailangan? Kami ba? At magkano lang ba ang minimum wage ngayon? Yung P125 across the board nga di nyo mabigay mga sira ulo kayo. Mabilis maubos ang sahod namin dahil tumataas lahat ng bilihin. Nagiisip ka ba? 6. Ang mahal ng gamot! Pero nakakabili kami ng alak, sigarilyo, shabu, marijuana, etc.PXO: Ika nga ni Norman Wilwayco, bakit muna mahal ang mga gamot? Yung mga drugs, di ba mga general din ang nagbibigay proteksyon dyan?7. Wala pa kaming trabaho! Madalas kasama namin barkada namin sa inuman at sugalan.
PXO: Gusto niyo maraming walang trabaho para laging mababa ang sahod. Babaratin ninyo kami ng husto tapos sasabihin niyo sa amin magpasalamat kami na may trabaho kami. Tapos isasabay niyo pa ang Job Fair tuwing Mayo Uno para kunwari maraming trabahong nalilikha. E puro kontraktwal lang naman na trabaho nilalako dun, bukod sa napakakonti lang ang nakakapasok. Kaya nga maraming nagaabroad e. Tungkol sa pagsusugal, di ba si LTO Chief Virgie Torres ang nakita noon naglalaro sa casino? Yung jueteng, di ba kayo rin may pakana nun?8. Pasukan nanaman wala kaming pambili ng kagamitan sa pag aaral ng mga anak namin! Pero may pang laro sila ng dota.
PXO: Napupunta na kasi sa pambili ng pagkain yung dapat pambili namin ng kagamitan sa pagaaral. Hindi lahat ng anak namin panay laro ng dota. Yung iba nagiging aktibista. 9. Wala kang pake sa environment Noynoy! Pero nagpuputol kami ng mga kahoy at nagsusunog ng mga plastik.
PXO: Sino nga ba ang nagbukas ng pinto para sa pagmimina at pagtotroso ng mga dayuhan? Hindi naman kami diba? 10. Ang daming magnanakaw sa termino mo! Pero kami rin naman ang bumoto sa mga senador at congressman na tiwali.
Hindi namin binoto yan. Noong nakaraang eleksyon lumabas ang 60-30-10 na pattern di ba? Tapos hindi pa nga kumpleto yung bilangan dahil sira ang mga PCOS na binili niyo na bilyones ang halaga. Tapos gusto nyo pang bumili ulit ng bagong PCOS para sa 2016. Ang sarap gastusin ng hindi niyo pera no?Lesson of the story: Palagi natin sinisisi lahat sa pangulo ang problema natin pero hindi natin namamalayan na tayo na pala ang may problema.PXO: Hindi lang simpleng Pangulo ang problema, kundi mismong SISTEMA. Yung SISTEMA ang gusto naming palitan. At bahagi si Noynoy ng sistema. Gusto naming patalsikin si BS dahil kinatawan siya ng paghahari ng mga Haciendero’t Burgesya Kumprador (mga tulad nina Sy at Ayala). Huwag mong sabihing wala nang matinong pwedeng ipalit kay PNoy. Halos 100 Milyon na ang populasyon, Sa dinami-dami natin, kung ang tingin mo walang pwedeng pumalit sa ganitong SISTEMA, malamang ikaw na ang problema.
via Pixel Offensive

kungfu-mulutan:

REKLAMO NAMIN KAY NOYNOY AQUINO:


(Unang binasag ng manunulat na si Norman Wilwayco ang bulok na pananaw ng mga dilawan. Ito ay sagot ng PXO sa parehas na kulumpon ng mga tanong)

1. Wala na kami pambili ng bigas! Pero may pang internet kami araw-araw para batikusin ang pangulo.


PXO: Mga buwiset. Sa panahon lang ni PNoy pinakamataas ang presyo ng bigas. Gusto nyo kayo lang ang may internet?Online media na nga lang ang espasyo naming nais ng pagbabago, gusto nyo pang ipagkait dahil sa CYBERCRIME LAW. Kayo araw-araw nga nagiinternet pero para saan? bugbugin kami ng balita tungkol kay Vhong Navarro?

2. Ang mahal ng tuition di na namin mapag aral mga anak namin! Pero nakabili kami ng tiket worth 18k para makapanood sila ng One Direction concert.

PXO: Bakit nyo ba hinahayaang tumaas ang tuition fee? Di ba KARAPATAN ang edukasyon? Tapos sabi nyo huwag na kaming magprivate kung ayaw namin ng tuition fee.Pag lumipat naman kami, ang taas pa rin ang singil. Eh sa EARIST (isang state college), tinutulan nila ang mataas na singil, anong ginawa ng admin? Blacklisted ang a 30+ estudyante na lumaban. Ano’ng gusto nyo? Kayo lang ang edukado? Mahiya naman kayo kay Krystel Tejada. Tsaka di namin kayang bumili ng 1D ticket. Kung P400,000 na bulok na computer kayang kaya niyong bilhin, 1D ticket pa kaya?

3. Ang dumi ng Maynila kasalanan ni Noyoy to! Pero kami rin naman ang nagkakalat ng mga basura.

PXO: Sa totoo lang mas matindi magkalat si Kris Aquino. 

4. Di namin kaya buhayin mga anak namin! Tatlo lang talaga ang kaya naming buhayin pero syam kasi ang anak namin.

PXO: Binubuhay namin ang mga anak namin sa sariling sikap, hindi sa pagnakaw ng pinaghirapan ng iba. Hindi overpopulation ang problema kundi yung sobrang katakawan nyo. Kahit 2 lang ang tao sa Pilipinas, kung kinakain ni Juan ang para kay Pedro, gutom pa rin ang kalalabasan. Teka, san niyo ba nakuha ang datos nyo? Makisalamuha din sa masa pag may time.

5. Ang bilis maubos ng sahod! Pero sa tuwing may sahod diretso na agad kami sa mall para makapagshopping, sabay party sa gabi.

PXO: Ang binabanggit mo ay yung lifestyle ni Kris Aquino. Hindi kami ganun. Wala kayong kwenta. Si Noynoy at si Mar deretso sa mall kapag ninakawan ng barya si Henry Sy. Yang mga may ari ng mall na sina Henry Sy at Ayala ang may pinakamalaking pakinabang sa panunungkulan ninyo. Kami ba ang nagbigay ng permit na gumawa sila ng sandamakmak na mall sa EDSA na din namin kailangan? Kami ba? At magkano lang ba ang minimum wage ngayon? Yung P125 across the board nga di nyo mabigay mga sira ulo kayo. Mabilis maubos ang sahod namin dahil tumataas lahat ng bilihin. Nagiisip ka ba? 

6. Ang mahal ng gamot! Pero nakakabili kami ng alak, sigarilyo, shabu, marijuana, etc.

PXO: Ika nga ni Norman Wilwayco, bakit muna mahal ang mga gamot? Yung mga drugs, di ba mga general din ang nagbibigay proteksyon dyan?

7. Wala pa kaming trabaho! Madalas kasama namin barkada namin sa inuman at sugalan.


PXO: Gusto niyo maraming walang trabaho para laging mababa ang sahod. Babaratin ninyo kami ng husto tapos sasabihin niyo sa amin magpasalamat kami na may trabaho kami. Tapos isasabay niyo pa ang Job Fair tuwing Mayo Uno para kunwari maraming trabahong nalilikha. E puro kontraktwal lang naman na trabaho nilalako dun, bukod sa napakakonti lang ang nakakapasok. Kaya nga maraming nagaabroad e. Tungkol sa pagsusugal, di ba si LTO Chief Virgie Torres ang nakita noon naglalaro sa casino? Yung jueteng, di ba kayo rin may pakana nun?

8. Pasukan nanaman wala kaming pambili ng kagamitan sa pag aaral ng mga anak namin! Pero may pang laro sila ng dota.


PXO: Napupunta na kasi sa pambili ng pagkain yung dapat pambili namin ng kagamitan sa pagaaral. Hindi lahat ng anak namin panay laro ng dota. Yung iba nagiging aktibista. 

9. Wala kang pake sa environment Noynoy! Pero nagpuputol kami ng mga kahoy at nagsusunog ng mga plastik.


PXO: Sino nga ba ang nagbukas ng pinto para sa pagmimina at pagtotroso ng mga dayuhan? Hindi naman kami diba? 

10. Ang daming magnanakaw sa termino mo! Pero kami rin naman ang bumoto sa mga senador at congressman na tiwali.


Hindi namin binoto yan. Noong nakaraang eleksyon lumabas ang 60-30-10 na pattern di ba? Tapos hindi pa nga kumpleto yung bilangan dahil sira ang mga PCOS na binili niyo na bilyones ang halaga. Tapos gusto nyo pang bumili ulit ng bagong PCOS para sa 2016. Ang sarap gastusin ng hindi niyo pera no?

Lesson of the story: Palagi natin sinisisi lahat sa pangulo ang problema natin pero hindi natin namamalayan na tayo na pala ang may problema.

PXO: Hindi lang simpleng Pangulo ang problema, kundi mismong SISTEMA. Yung SISTEMA ang gusto naming palitan. At bahagi si Noynoy ng sistema. Gusto naming patalsikin si BS dahil kinatawan siya ng paghahari ng mga Haciendero’t Burgesya Kumprador (mga tulad nina Sy at Ayala). Huwag mong sabihing wala nang matinong pwedeng ipalit kay PNoy. Halos 100 Milyon na ang populasyon, Sa dinami-dami natin, kung ang tingin mo walang pwedeng pumalit sa ganitong SISTEMA, malamang ikaw na ang problema.

via Pixel Offensive

kungfu-mulutan:

Close your eyes and rise as oceans Breathin’ floatin’ across the waves Underneath you all sorts of emotions As this blue horizon calls And no God or man can control where you roam As current serves my motor I’m pushin’ Now awake! like the oceans feel your waves Tentacles to crash rocks on shores Tides devoid of emotions All your wonderful dreams washed away As i stand on the sand dragged by your hand Like an anchor thats bringin’ me Down below the water ‘Cause man He can control where you roam Now rest as oceans Be still, still yet in constant motion Quiet but never afraid Silent but always awake And no God nor man can dictate where you stand No bouderies cast forever You last forever. As the ocean calls your name
Wolfgang - As Oceans

\m/

kungfu-mulutan:

Close your eyes and rise as oceans
Breathin’ floatin’ across the waves
Underneath you all sorts of emotions
As this blue horizon calls
And no God or man can control where you roam
As current serves my motor
I’m pushin’
Now awake! like the oceans feel your waves
Tentacles to crash rocks on shores
Tides devoid of emotions
All your wonderful dreams washed away
As i stand on the sand dragged by your hand
Like an anchor thats bringin’ me
Down below the water
‘Cause man He can control where you roam
Now rest as oceans
Be still,
still yet in constant motion
Quiet but never afraid
Silent but always awake
And no God nor man can dictate where you stand
No bouderies cast forever
You last forever.
As the ocean calls your name

Wolfgang - As Oceans

\m/